Grow Wild Garlic in Pots

It's easy to grow wild garlic in pots. In this post, I'm going to show you how to pre-cultivate wild garlic into healthy seedlings that you can transplant outside later!

Wild garlic in pots

Did you know that it's possible to grow wild garlic in pots. It's easy to get started, just remember to put your wild garlic outside in the coming months. Photo: Anna Broette.

 

Wild garlic is one of my favorite spring delicacies for the garden. It only grows above ground for a very short time in spring, so I always try to enjoy this luxurious allium when I can!

You can usually buy your wild garlic sets in fall and winter, when the gardening inspiration might be a little bit... lackluster. On top of that, the ground might be frozen too. But don't worry, this is the perfect time to grow wild garlic in pots instead! Pre-cultivating them in pots is a great way to prepare for spring. I usually get great results with this method!

 

Read more: Homemade wild garlic oil

 

Wild garlic in pots

This is what the wild garlic looks like so far, I got it from one of my beds in November. You can put the wild garlic in pots before planting them outside later.

 

Plant wild garlic in pots

When you receive your wild garlic sets for next year's season, try to plant them as soon as possible. They can survive without soil for a while, but I wouldn't take any chances and leave them out too long. Plant your wild garlic in pots right away if you can't put them outside yet.

Simply fill a plastic pot (around 4-5 inches in diameter) halfway up with planting soil from a bag, or soil from your compost. Put five garlic sets into the soil, with the roots facing downwards. Don't worry of they are slightly tilted. Then, add soil up to the edge and water lightly.

Now, it's time to put the pot in a cool area where it won't freeze overnight. It's essential that it's not too warm, but it's okay if it's dark. As long as you have it somewhere that you pass by often, so you can keep an eye on the plants. Possible locations are for example: A cold garage, conservatory, shed, or greenhouse for example. If there is a risk of freezing temperatures, it might be a good idea to bury the pot temporarily, so it has a layer of soil around it as insulation.

 

Read more: Growing borlotti beans in a cold climate

 

When the plant grows

As soon as the wild garlic sprout starts peeking up from the soil, bring it to a bright area so it can start growing properly. If it's still cold outdoors, you can always put your wild garlic in a window. But preferably, in a cooler area.

Wild garlic is used to cold temperatures and can even survive frosty nights, so you don't need to fuss with it. It does however not grow  very well in room temperature, so make sure to put the wild garlic in a cool place.

If you want to start harvesting your new wild garlic plants, just remember to only pinch a leaf or two from each plant. If you take too many leaves from a plant when it's still young and vulnerable, there's a risk that it will lose momentum and weaken.

 

Wild garlic in pots

We grow wild garlic in pots at my own garden shop, it works really well!

Transplant the wild garlic

When the soil outside has thawed, it's time to transplant your wild garlic to your outdoor beds.

You can plant the wild garlic as a single plant, meaning the entire pot in one spot. You can also split your wild garlic plant and put the parts in a cluster close together. Over time, the wild garlic will both produce side bulbs and spread through seeds, and sooner or later form a larger stand. If the plant is happy where you put it of course!

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Vårens första ramslök

The first wild garlic of spring peeks up from the soil by my currant bushes.

 

En rugge ramslök

This is what the growing spot in the picture above looks like when the wild garlic has grown for a few weeks. Lots of leaves to harvest!

 

So, now you know what to do if you buy wild garlic sets in fall and winter, and the ground is frozen outdoor. Simply plant your wild garlic in pots and then transplant them outside!

Of course, you might be wondering if it's possible to grow wild garlic in pots permanently? Well, I tried it but found it challenging. The plant withers in early summer and then stays dormant for the rest of the year. For me, it's been hard to remember watering and taking care of a dormant plant like that. I've accidentally emptied several pots because I forgot what was in them. It doesn't help that the pots look completely empty too. Theoretically, it should work, but I just haven't managed to keep the discipline and focus. But, you can always try it!

Good luck with your wild garlic,
/Sara Bäckmo

22. November 2023

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